Folkdays: Violets

FOR MORE FOLKDAYS CONTENT, SEE MY BLOG.

A spring bloom I’ve been really drawn to this year is violets. A few months ago, I would have struggled to identify these plant from any other purple flowers I spotted in a verge. But now I know what to look for, I am spotting them everywhere!

Recently, I have had a go at foraging these flowers, and crafting them into a sweet violet syrup. It’s also been a while since I’ve written a Folkdays post, so I will be combining the process I followed with the folklore of these flowers in this post.

Continue reading “Folkdays: Violets”

Folkdays: Snowdrops

FOR MORE FOLKDAYS CONTENT, SEE MY BLOG.

It has been quite a tumultuous year since I wrote my Folkdays post on bluebells last May. At that time, I was adjusting to a new normal of being locked-down in a city, with only a few spots of nature to be found. Now, I have moved back home, to a place where nature abounds – and while I am looking forward to the spring and the arrival of the bluebells, I am also enjoying the sight of another early spring bloom: the snowdrop.

As heralds of the coming spring, I am sure snowdrops come with plenty of folklore: let’s explore, below.

Continue reading “Folkdays: Snowdrops”

Folkdays: Apple Lore

FOR MORE FOLKDAYS CONTENT, SEE MY BLOG.

Summer comes to a close with the autumn equinox. Falling on or around 22 September, the days and nights are of equal length, before the balance tips towards steadily increasing hours of darkness.

Known as Mabon in the Wheel of the Year calendar, this would traditionally be a time for collecting in the last fruits of summer, foraging for the autumnal abundances of berries and nuts, and celebrating with a harvest festival or feast. One symbol or association of Mabon is the apple. This humble fruit is as abundant in its folklore as it is in its yield: let’s explore more, below.

Continue reading “Folkdays: Apple Lore”

Folkdays: Goldfinches

FOR MORE FOLKDAYS CONTENT, SEE MY BLOG.

One of the things I feel I really miss out on when I live in the city are the birds.

The skies above are mostly the domain of urban gulls and wood pigeons. Sometimes there will be the chattering of a magpie in the early hours, or the warbling song of a blackbird at dawn or dusk. Very occasionally, I’ve seen blue tits and even a great tit in the little courtyard outside my flat, which has a few bushes and trees.

The other morning, I heard a little twittering song I don’t usually hear, and was delighted to see two goldfinches flitting about the courtyard. Their beautiful colours brightened my morning, and inspired me to research their folklore for today’s Folkdays post.

Continue reading “Folkdays: Goldfinches”

Folkdays: Reviewing The Hedgewitch Botanical Oracle

FOR MORE FOLKDAYS CONTENT, SEE MY BLOG.

My very first Folkdays post was a review, of Shakespeare and the Folktale by Charlotte Artese. This was a book I had read, aside from simply for my own enjoyment, as preparation for my MA dissertation. Well, that dissertation is now underway, and so I have not had much time to dedicate to writing a Folkdays post this week!

I have wanted to do another review ever since that first post. This week seems as good a time as any to write down my thoughts on The Hedgewitch Botanical Oracle, by Siolo Thompson. Read about it below!

Continue reading “Folkdays: Reviewing The Hedgewitch Botanical Oracle”